Rapid Patient Mover (RPM)

Product Description and Instructions for Use

The Rapid Patient Mover (RPM) is a patient moving adjunct that is easy to carry and deploy. The RPM is intended for use by trained rescuers and healthcare providers.

When determining how best to secure and move a patient using the RPM, trained rescuers and healthcare providers should refer to their training and local protocol for decision making purposes. The makers of the RPM do not guarantee or imply that any of the recommendations and techniques discussed and shown in these instructions will be best suited or even allowed by your local protocol for your particular situation.

WARNING!

The Rapid Patient Mover is not intended to be used to treat an injury.  The RPM is not intended to stabilize a person in any way that may be construed to be aiding in the treatment or prevention of any injury or illness. 

The RPM is not intended to be used as a spinal immobilization device. While it does offer some ability to keep a patient supine, it does not by itself adequately restrict spinal motion. If spinal motion restriction is required for your patient, most available spinal immobilization or spinal motion restriction adjuncts can be effectively used in conjunction with the RPM. For example, a patient on a backboard can easily be carried or dragged in the RPM. Please refer to your local protocol for proper spinal immobilization techniques.

Deploying the RPM

SINGLE RESCUER, HEAD TO TOE 

Remove the RPM from its case and place it at the head of the patient so that the folded sides are up (FIG 1).

    Unfold the sides of the RPM. Place the RPM under the patients head so that two loop handles are pointed toward the feet and two handles are pointed away from the head (FIG 2).

    Move to a position facing the patient. Reach under the patient’s arms and grasp the two loop handles that will be just at the shoulders. Pull the loop handles toward the feet (FIG 3).

    Continue to pull flat against the ground and move toward the patients feet until the RPM is entirely deployed (FIG 4).  If necessary, reposition the patient up or down on the RPM by gently sliding so that the patients head is resting in the center of an embedded plate. 

    NOTE: If the leading edge of the RPM comes to rest against any part of the patient or their clothing, prohibiting the device from easily being advanced, manually reposition the patient slightly to free the edge of the RPM and continue to deploy as indicated above.

    SINGLE RESCUER, TOE TO HEAD

    Remove the RPM from its case and place it at the feet of the patient so that the folded sides are up (FIG 5).

    Unfold the sides of the RPM. Place the RPM under the patients legs so that two loop handles are pointed toward the feet and two loop handles are pointed toward the head (FIG 6).

    Move into a position next to the patient’s torso and facing the RPM. Reach under the patient’s legs and grasp the two loop handles that will be just below the buttocks (FIG 7). 

    Pull the loop handles toward the head. Continue to pull flat against the ground and move toward the patients head until the RPM is in position under the patients head (FIG 9). 

    Move to the patient’s feet and finish deploying the RPM by pulling the loop handles toward the feet (FIG 10). If necessary, reposition the patient up or down on the RPM by gently sliding so that the patients head is resting in the center of an embedded plate. 

    NOTE: If the leading edge of the RPM comes to rest against any part of the patient or their clothing, prohibiting the device from easily being advanced, manually reposition the patient slightly to free the edge of the RPM and continue to deploy as indicated above.

    Single rescuer, waist deployment

    Remove the RPM from its case and place it at the side of the patient so that the folded sides are up. Unfold the sides of the RPM.  Place the RPM under the lower back of the patient at the waist so that two loop handles are pointed toward the feet and two loop handles are pointed toward the head (FIG 11).

    Move into a position next to the patient’s torso and facing the RPM. Reach under the patient’s sides and grasp the two loop handles. Pull the loop handles toward the head (FIG 12).

    Continue to pull flat against the ground and move toward the patients head until the RPM is in position under the patients head (FIG 13). 

    Move to the patient’s feet and finish deploying the RPM by pulling the loop handles toward the feet (FIG 14). If necessary, reposition the patient up or down on the RPM by gently sliding so that the patients head is resting in the center of an embedded plate. 

    NOTE: If the leading edge of the RPM comes to rest against any part of the patient or their clothing, prohibiting the device from easily being advanced, manually reposition the patient slightly to free the edge of the RPM and continue to deploy as indicated above.

    TWO RESCUERS, HEAD TO TOE

    Remove the RPM from its case and place it at the head of the patient so that the folded sides are up. Unfold the sides of the RPM.  Rescuer 1 places the RPM under the patients head so that two loop handles are pointed toward the feet and two loop handles are pointed away from the head (FIG 15).

    Rescuer 2 moves to a position facing the patient.  Rescuer 1 reaches over the patients arms and holds the patient still (FIG 16).

    Rescuer 2 reaches under the patient’s arms and grasps the two loop handles that will be just at the shoulders. Rescuer 2 pulls the loop handles toward the feet (FIG 17) while Rescuer 1 maintains the patient’s position.

    Rescuer 2 continues to pull flat against the ground and move toward the patients feet until the RPM is entirely deployed (FIG 18).  If necessary, Rescuer 1 repositions the patient up or down on the RPM by gently sliding so that the patients head is resting in the center of an imbedded plate.

    NOTE: If the leading edge of the RPM comes to rest against any part of the patient or their clothing, prohibiting the device from easily being advanced, manually reposition the patient slightly to free the edge of the RPM and continue to deploy as indicated above.

    TWO RESCUERS, TOE TO HEAD

    Remove the RPM from its case and place it at the feet of the patient so that the folded sides are up. Unfold the sides of the RPM.  Rescuer 1 places the RPM under the patients legs so that two loop handles are pointed toward the feet and two loop handles are pointed toward the head (FIG 19).

    Rescuer 2 moves into a position next to the patient’s torso and facing the RPM. Rescuer 1 grasps the patient’s legs and maintains the patients position as Rescuer 2 reaches under the patients legs and grasps the two loop handles that will be just below the buttocks (FIG 20) and pulls the loop handles toward the head. 

    Rescuer 2 continues to pull flat against the ground and move toward the patients head until the RPM is in position under the patients head (FIG 21).

    Rescuer 1 finishes deploying the RPM by pulling the loop handles toward the feet (FIG 22). If necessary, the patient can be repositioned by either rescuer by gently sliding the patient up or down on the RPM so that the patients head is resting in the center of an imbedded plate. 

    NOTE: If the leading edge of the RPM comes to rest against any part of the patient or their clothing, prohibiting the device from easily being advanced, manually reposition the patient slightly to free the edge of the RPM and continue to deploy as indicated above.

    TWO RESCUERS, WAIST DEPLOYMENT

    Remove the RPM from its case and place it at the side of the patient so that the folded sides are up. Unfold the sides of the RPM. Place the RPM under the lower back of the patient at the waist so that two loop handles are pointed toward the feet and two loop handles are pointed toward the head (FIG 23).

    Rescuer 1 moves into a position next to the patient’s torso and facing the RPM.  Rescuer 2 moves to a position facing the patient near the legs (FIG 24).

    Rescuer 1 reaches under the patient’s sides and grasps the two loop handles. Rescuer 2 grasps the loop handles near the patient’s buttocks. Both rescuers pull on their loop handles outward against the ground and move toward the patients head  or feet until the RPM is completely deployed (FIG 25). If necessary, reposition the patient up or down on the RPM by gently sliding so that the patients head is resting in the center of an embedded plate.

    NOTE: If the leading edge of the RPM comes to rest against any part of the patient or their clothing, prohibiting the device from easily being advanced, manually reposition the patient slightly to free the edge of the RPM and continue to deploy as indicated above.

    TWO RESCUERS, SIDE DEPLOYMENT

    Remove the RPM from its case and place it at the side of the patient near the head so that the folded sides are up. Unfold the sides of the RPM (FIG 26). Open the RPM by grasping two loop handles and briskly pushing the device away from you (FIG 27).

    Rescuer 1 positions next to the patient on the opposite side from the RPM. Rescuer 1 rolls the patient toward himself (FIG 28). 

    Rescuer 2 pushes the RPM under the patient, using the imbedded plates to assist in tucking the device (FIG 29). Rescuer 1 rolls the patient back onto the RPM. If necessary, the patient can be repositioned on the RPM by gently sliding so that the patients head is resting in the center of an embedded plate.

    Proper Patient Positioning

    POSITIONING THE HEAD

    All patients should be positioned on the RPM so that their head is roughly in the center of one of the embedded plates (FIG 30).

    POSITIONING SMALL PATIENTS

    For patients under approximately 50 inches in height it is helpful to fold over the last plate section of the RPM over the patients legs (FIG 31). This will aid in ensuring that the patient’s head remains over an embedded plate by limiting the amount a patient could slide in the RPM when being dragged.

    Securing The Patient

    USING PATIENT SECURING STRAPS

    The RPM is supplied with two securing straps that are designed to be easily attached to any of the attachment points on the RPM. Select the attachment point you wish to use and simply connect the carabiner through the spring loaded gate (FIG 32). Tighten the strap as necessary by pulling the strap through the buckle.  

    ATTACHMENT POINTS

    All of the spaces created between stitches in the 1” strap running in several rows on the RPM are designed to be both handles for lifting and carrying a patient in the RPM, and attachment points for securing straps (FIG 33).

    The Loop handles that are present in the 2” strap at both ends of the RPM are also designed as attachment points or handles, and are specifically intended to be the primary attachment points for the included drag harness (FIG 34).

    SECURING METHODS

    The securing straps can be attached to any attachment points along the lengths of the RPM. Care should be taken to ensure that the patient is secured in a way that limits their ability to slide or shift greatly during a drag or carry. See Fig 35 and 36 for examples.

    While it is always advisable to completely secure your patient prior to moving them with the RPM, there may be situations that it is in the best interest of the rescuers and the patient to hastily leave an area. These situations may require that you minimize time spent securing the patient to only that which is absolutely necessary.  While not optimal, placing one securing strap over the patient’s torso and securing it so that the strap is snug will keep the patient from sliding out of the RPM during a drag removal (FIG 36).

    NOTE: This method of securing the patient is not sufficient if the patient needs to be dragged up or down stairs or any other significant angle.

    ALTERNATIVE SECURING METHOD

    Due to the availability of multiple attachment points one method of securing a patient into the RPM involves passing the securing straps through several attachment points before clipping in the far carabiner (FIG 37). 

    Dragging a Patient

    The RPM is made from a highly abrasion resistant ballistic weave nylon. This material, along with the embedded plates, allows the device to be dragged over most surfaces.  The RPM stands up to dragging over most indoor surfaces such as tile, hardwood, carpet and linoleum with minimal wear over short distances. The RPM can be dragged over grass and sand very effectively, with only moderate signs of wear over short distances. 

    NOTE: The RPM is not designed for dragging over rough surfaces such as asphalt, unfinished concrete or rocks. Testing has shown that these surfaces will generally create holes in the material base at the greatest points of friction. 

    If it becomes necessary to drag a patient over a rough surface, the embedded plates will partially protect the patient from harm.  While holes may develop in the carrier, it is extremely unlikely that the RPM will lose any of its functionality.

    ATTACHING THE DRAG HARNESS

    The drag harness comes with two carabiners.  Attach the drag harness to the RPM by clipping the carabiners to the loop handles at either end of the RPM (FIG 38).

    NOTE:  the patient should always be dragged head first using the loop handles as attachment points for the drag harness or other dragging equipment such as rescue rope or straps.  DO NOT use the 1” side attachment points for the purpose of attaching dragging equipment.

    SINGLE RESCUER DRAG

    With the drag harness attached, a single rescuer can place one arm loop over each shoulder and begin to drag by leaning forward and walking (FIG 40).  As an alternative, both arm loops can be placed over the same shoulder (FIG 41).

    TWO RESCUER DRAG

    With the drag harness attached, two rescuers can place one arm each into an arm loop. This should be done so that the drag harness is used between the two rescuers (FIG 42) and NOT placed on the outside arms of the rescuers (Fig 43). 

    MANIPULATING THE PATIENT IN TIGHT AREAS

    When approaching a corner or other obstacle it is helpful to allow as much room as possible to negotiate turns. Occasionally it will be necessary to manipulate your patient around corners and obstacles with your hands. When dragging a patient using the drag harness you can reach back and grab the intermediate drag harness strap with your hand, and guide the patient around obstacles with them in a closer position to you (FIG 44). Once the obstacle is cleared you can return to dragging as described above.

    Carrying a patient

    CARRYING FROM THE SIDES

    The multiple rows of handles on both sides of the RPM ensure that you will always have a handle to grab right were you need it. Two or more rescuers can stand on either side of the patient and lift (FIG 45).

    CARRYING FROM THE ENDS

    There may be instances when a patient needs to be carried from the head and foot ends due to space limitations. To do this, lift using the loop handles on both ends of the RPM.

    Moving a patient up or down an incline

    ATTACHING A ROPE

    The RPM can easily be dragged up or lowered down an incline by attaching a rope or ropes to the loop handles on either end of the device (FIG 46).  

    NOTE:  Any time a patient needs to be moved up or down an incline in the RPM it is important to ensure that patient movement inside the RPM is minimized by properly securing the patient.

    Using the RPM with LUCAS CPR

    SECURING THE PATIENT WITH LUCAS CPR

    When the RPM is used to move a patient receiving LUCAS CPR, use one securing strap to stabilize the LUCAS in the RPM (FIG 47). Use the second securing strap to secure the lower half of the patients body (FIG 48).

    CARRYING

    The RPM can be carried as described above, even with LUCAS CPR being preformed.  

    Cleaning Instructions

    If your RPM becomes soiled it can be easily cleaned, either in a commercial washing machine at low temperature or by hand using warm water with a mild detergent.  Allow the RPM to hang to dry completely before returning it to service. 

    Folding and Storage

    The RPM is designed to be put away as easily as it is deployed.  It is important to note that in order for the RPM to take advantage of the Z-fold design for rapid deployment, it must be folded correctly when it is stored. 

    Step 1: Deploy the RPM on a clean, flat surface. Place the RPM so that the patient carrying side is face up.  Visually inspect the RPM for wear and ensure that it is clean and dry.

    NOTE: Because of the strength of the ballistic weave nylon, the RPM remains a safe and effective patient carrier even if it is found to have small tears or areas of wear in the fabric.  Holes in the ballistic nylon do not readily expand. 

    Step 2: Kneel at one end of the RPM. Reach forward and grasp the RPM on both sides at points even with the furthest edge of the first embedded plate (FIG 49).

    Step 3: Lift up and slide the section forward until the first embedded plate is evenly placed on top of the middle embedded plate (FIG 50)

    Step 4:  Now grasp the RPM so that you are holding 3 layers of material on both sides at points even with the furthest edge of the middle embedded plate (FIG 52). 

    Step 5:  Lift up and slide the first two sections forward until all three embedded plates are lined up on top of each other (FIG 53).

    Step 6:  Fold the material on both sides of the RPM inward so that they are resting on top of the stack of embedded plates (FIG 54). 

    Return the RPM to the carrying case.